A life lesson long in arriving

~a column by Colleen O’Brien

Months ago – years ago, now – I began a rapid slide into a low-grade fever that I called “This can’t be happening in my country.”

After two years and nine months after an official election on top of months of what for any other candidate would have been really bad press, I’ve finally found a way not to go mad when I hear the leader of the free world (the position was once called this) say undemocratic things; also known as tyrant rants; strongman bluster; prejudice against the other (which includes females), such as the following: Continue reading A life lesson long in arriving

Warren speaks to full house in Jefferson

Elizabeth Warren | GCNO photo by Janice Harbaugh

~by Janice Harbaugh for GreeneCountyNewsOnline

It was standing room only for the Elizabeth Warren town hall meeting hosted by the Greene County Democrats at History Boy Theater on Aug. 8 in Jefferson. Chris Henning, Greene County Democratic party chair, introduced Warren.

Warren, senior senator from Massachusetts, is competing for the Democratic nomination for president in the 2020 election. Warren spoke for more than an hour to an estimated crowd of 200 people about her ideas for change in government.

Warren spoke of a need for structural change in government to take control away from drug companies, big investors, and oil companies that she believes control decisions made by the president and Congress. She proposes “the biggest anti-corruption plan since Watergate.” Continue reading Warren speaks to full house in Jefferson

Delaney promotes ‘common sense stuff, not huge change’

John Delaney  |GCNO photo

Democratic presidential candidate John Delaney over the past two years has listened to hundreds of voters at comparatively small campaign events, and he has his own version of what they’re looking for. “They’re looking for a steady set of hands on the economy. They’re not looking for someone who’s going to cause upheaval in the economic policy with some of these extreme ideas, and they’re looking for someone who’s decent,” he said. “People want common sense stuff, not huge change.”

He shared some of his “common sense stuff” with about 20 voters at David and Emily Weaver’s farm northeast of Rippey Tuesday morning.

According to Delaney, America is a magnificent country that has every advantage a country could want in 2019 except for one thing: the government is broken. Continue reading Delaney promotes ‘common sense stuff, not huge change’

Scholten’s campaign launch includes stop in Jefferson

J.D. Scholten, candidate for 4th Congressional District, in Jefferson Aug. 6

Greene County Democrats got a preview of J.D. Scholten’s campaign for the Fourth Congressional District seat Tuesday at Greene Bean Coffee. Scholten on Monday announced his candidacy, with the New York Times and the Sioux City Journal breaking the story prior to a planned launch in Sioux City.

Scholten ran against Rep. Steve King in 2018 and came closer to unseating him than any other challenger since he was first elected to Congress in 2002. King’s margin in 2018 was 3 percentage points. He received 25,000 more votes than there are registered Democrats in the district.

“Last time we hoped we could win. This time we know we can win,” Scholten told an enthusiastic group at the short-notice event. Continue reading Scholten’s campaign launch includes stop in Jefferson

Simpatico

[Editor’s note – This week, Colleen O’Brien offers a story in lieu of her regular column.]

~by Colleen O’Brien

We walk leisurely down the mountain, Buster lagging behind, worn out. I too am lazy, but it’s an easy walk. I’m in the lead, and I listen to Ned talk about Indians. I respond to him now and then, lose his voice as I round a boulder, it returns as he follows. My shadow leaps out long and bony in front of me, connected to my feet – it’s in the lead, not me. The early evening sun warms my back and then I’m behind a rock in the golden dust of the trail and it’s just me, no silhouette girl loping in front. I’m hot, then I’m cool, then the sun catches sight of me again and gives me back my copycat companion who does exactly as I do, faithful as a saint. I don’t think I’ve played with her for years. Continue reading Simpatico

Grandmother’s House – revisited

[Editor’s note – The following story by Valerie Ogren was awarded a purple ribbon and Best Overall exhibit in the genealogy class at the Greene County Fair. Valerie shares it here with GreeneCountyNewsOnline readers.]

(This is from an April 2015 Tree Tracings column. Some of you may have seen it before, but not all of our members have computers or access to the local newspapers.)

At our November meeting, Elaine Deluhery gave what turned out to be an interesting program – to me anyway. It was an idea she found online and I thought “Oh, what the heck, it will do in a pinch and fill 30 minutes”. Continue reading Grandmother’s House – revisited

The eras we live through

~a column by Colleen O’Brien

The word postmodern bugged me for years. No one I asked could give me a definition I could understand.

The dictionaries I searched through were not much help. Postmodernism was defined as “…reacting against the theory and practice of modern.” I looked up modern: “breaking with the past….”

So, it seemed to me they meant the same thing, postmodern just more of modern. All that the moderns or postmoderns had to do was make a break from the rules of the prior generation. Why there had to be two words meaning the same thing confused me. Continue reading The eras we live through

Letter to the editor – Dick Finch

To the editor,

I love living in Jefferson but we’re not a Carroll or Boone and residents and city management and council should start to realize this and quit trying to spend us into the next century. All these walking trails, beautifying our businessless county square and signs all over directing people to ???

Lest we all forget about our shambled streets, our dilapidated sewer system causing backups and doing nothing about it but apologies and promises. Continue reading Letter to the editor – Dick Finch

The trouble with borders

~a column by Colleen O’Brien

Friday, July 12, 2019 was designated by a national group of activists to protest the incarceration of “unaccompanied minors” crossing our southern border.

In 700 cities across the country, activists and children’s advocates, ordinary citizens with no affiliations, kids, people young, middle aged and old, female and male, black, brown and white gathered at children’s detention centers or in front of courthouses to make a statement against the incarceration of brown kids who have been separated from family or who crossed into the U.S. alone. Continue reading The trouble with borders

A prairie writer

~a column by Colleen O’Brien

When I was 10 or so, I discovered a row of books in the Jefferson library that I’d never seen, or I’d skipped by them. Or maybe I’d wandered into the adult section. For some time, I’d been waylaid by the “Silhouette Series,” biographies of the heroes of America – Betsy Ross, Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, Clara Barton — until the day I picked up a novel by the midwestern writer Willa Cather. I fell in love with each of her books in turn. O Pioneers! and Death Comes for the Archbishop kept me up late, but it was My Antonia that I read several times. And recently read again, three score years later. Continue reading A prairie writer

Doomed to repeat?

~a column by Colleen O’Brien

We are taught that if we don’t learn our history, we’re doomed to repeat it. To the dismay of lots of us, it’s happening; and quicker than we thought possible. After what I was taught as a schoolgirl in the ‘50s and ‘60s of the fascist Axis countries that brought the world to its knees in the ‘30s and ‘40s, I just knew it could never happen again. My youth and inexperience sipped from a cup full of hope; I did not know the cup had a hole in it till years later. Continue reading Doomed to repeat?